Monday, January 11, 2010

FT Press: Informationalizing Sports: Baseball, Football, and Basketball > Informationalizing Sports: Baseball, Football, and Basketball

Americans began playing baseball before the American Civil War, and it became a hugely popular sport that could be played by kids, young men in informal pickup games, local leagues, and eventually by professional teams organized in national leagues. In fact, the game became so popular that people around the world think of baseball as pure Americana, as culturally identified with the United States as apple pie, hot dogs, and democracy. Americans couldn't leave well enough alone. By the end of the 19th century, they were doing more than simply playing baseball; they were informationalizing it. During the 20th century they ran the game through every major information technology that came along, from radio to TV, into computers, and then all over the Internet. The heart of this informationalizing process was not just a story of reporting in local newspapers who played, won, and lost games; it was the collection and dissemination of extraordinary amounts of information about the game that makes this a useful case study to look at.
FT Press: Informationalizing Sports: Baseball, Football, and Basketball > Informationalizing Sports: Baseball, Football, and Basketball
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